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Outdoor Air Quantity



Classrooms and other school spaces must be ventilated to remove odors and other pollutants. The national consensus standard for outside air ventilation is ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2001, available at http://www.ashrae.org/

If outside air is provided through a mechanical system, then at least 15 cubic feet per minute (cfm) of outside air must be provided for each occupant. A typical classroom with 30 people requires a minimum of 15 x 30 or 450 cfm of outside air.

In spaces where the number of occupants is highly variable such as gyms, auditoriums and multipurpose spaces, demand controlled ventilation (DCV) systems can be used to vary the quantity of outside air ventilation in these spaces in response to the number of occupants. One technique for doing this is to install carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors that measure concentrations and vary the volume of outside air accordingly. If an auditorium fills up for school assembly, then CO2 concentrations will increase, a signal will be provided to the HVAC system and outside air volumes will be increased accordingly. When the spaces served by an air handler have highly variable occupancy, this type of control can both save energy and help control moisture (and mold) by reducing the quantity of humid outside air when it is not needed for ventilation. CO2 and other sensors must be periodically calibrated and maintained.

Air Filtration

In addition to "atmospheric dust," airborne particulates can include pollen, mold (fungal) spores, animal dander, insect proteins, pesticides, lead, and infectious bacteria and viruses. Designers can integrate features into the ventilation system that will provide benefits for the school occupants as well as the efficiency and longevity of the HVAC system. In addition, these features can reduce the need for expensive cleaning of the duct work and air handling units.

Filter Efficiency

  • Air filters should have a dust-spot rating between 35% and 80% or a Minimum Efficiency Rating Value (MERV) of between 8 and 13. The higher the rating, the better the protection for the equipment and the occupants. It has been estimated that a 30% increase in static pressure across a coil results in a $200 per 10,000 cfm of air movement (at 7 cents per KWH). This does not include the added cost of cleaning dirty heating or cooling oils, drain pans, or air ducts. Designers should consider specifying a low efficiency (~10%) pre-filter upstream of the main filters. The pre-filters are generally easy and inexpensive to change, and will capture a significant amount of the particulate mass in the air thereby extending the useful life of the more expensive main filters. See ASHRAE Standard 52.2-1999 Method of Testing General Ventilation Air Cleaning Devices for Removal Efficiency by Particle Size available at http://www.ashrae.org/

Pressure Drop







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